Letters Degree Program

Course Descriptions

 

ENGL 2113 AMERICAN LITERATURE I   (3 hours)

This course is a survey of the work of the major American poets, essayists, novelists, historians, critics, and dramatists from the Colonial Period to Whitman. The relationship of the literature surveyed to the time frame in which it was written will be shown.  Also, the value of great literature for the cultural enrichment of this generation will be noted. Prerequisite: ENGL 1113 or Advanced Placement. 

ENGL 2213 AMERICAN LITERATURE II (3 hours) 

This course is a survey of the great American writers from Whitman to the present. As in ENGL 2113, the relationship between the work and time era will be highlighted.  Discussion will be centered on literary texts and trends. Prerequisite: ENGL 1113 or Advanced Placement.  

ENGL 2313 INTERMEDIATE COMPOSITION I  (3 hours) 

This course is designed to improve a student’s college level writing skills as they relate to a specific audience.  The difference between the appropriate writing style for critical and other types of essays, research papers, journals, and abstracts will be explored.  

ENGL 2323 INTERMEDIATE COMPOSITION II  (3 hours) 

This course acquaints the student with a process of reading, responding to, analyzing, interpreting, and writing about three standard genres of literature: the short story, poetry, and drama. No prior literary study is assumed. 

ENGL 2413 INTRODUCTION TO JOURNALISM  (3 hours) 

This course is designed to acquaint the education students with basic news writing and editing, yearbook layout and design, and photography elements, as well as publications software and technology.  It includes a laboratory experience of working with the Harvester yearbook and doing newsletter publication.  In addition, the course looks at basic elements involved in sponsoring student publications.  

ENGL 3213 INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS  (3 hours) 

This course is an introduction to the study of human languages.  Phonics, semantics morphology, and syntax will be studied. Prerequisites: ENGL 1113 and ENGL 1213.  

ENGL 3313 MORPHOLOGY AND SYNTAX OF ENGLISH  (3 hours) 

This course provides a deep investigation into word and sentence level grammar of the English language.  Prerequisites: ENGL 1113 and ENGL 1213.  

ENGL 3413 DEVELOPMENT OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE  (3 hours) 

This course is the study of the English language from the time of earliest records, with emphasis on major external influences and internal changes which have shaped the present grammar, vocabulary, etc.  Prerequisites: ENGL 1113 and ENGL 1213.  

ENGL 3513 WORLD LITERATURE I  (3 hours) 

This course is a study of great literary works (selected from both Eastern and Western literatures) from classical antiquity to the Renaissance.  Prerequisites:  ENGL 1113 and ENGL 1213.  

ENGL 3523 WORLD LITERATURE II   (3 hours) 

This course is a study of great literary works representing the history of world literature from the Enlightenment to modern times.  Prerequisites:  ENGL 1113 and ENGL 1213. 

ENGL 3613 SHAKESPEARE  (3 hours) 

This course will briefly review the origin and development of drama, survey of the life and times of William Shakespeare, and study nine plays including the major tragedies. Prerequisites: ENGL 1113 and ENGL 1213. 

ENGL 3623 YOUNG ADULT LITERATURE (3 hours) 

This course will focus on the content of young adult literature (YAL), the diversity inherent in the genre, and appropriate strategies for encouraging student literary response to YAL and literature in general.  Prerequisites: ENGL 1113 and ENGL 1213.  

ENGL 3643 SURVEY OF BRITISH LITERATURE  (3 hours) 

This course is a survey of British literature from Anglo-Saxon to the present. Prerequisites: ENGL 1113 and ENGL 1213.  

ENGL 3723 CREATIVE WRITING  (3 hours)

This course provides training in writing and teaching poetry, short story, play, non-fiction and other genres.  Prerequisites: ENGL 1113 and ENGL 1213. 

ENGL 4903 SPECIAL TOPICS  (3 hours) 

This course presents various subjects in the area of study through research and writing or through visiting professors and lecturers that complement the curriculum and take advantage of the educational background, experience, and expertise of the instructor. Emphasis is given to the creative approaches, research, and/or collaborative learning to enrich the understanding of the student.  This course may be repeated with a change of subject matter for a maximum of nine credit hours. Prerequisite:  Permission of Program Director.  

HIST 2013 SELECTED TOPICS IN U.S. HISTORY (3 hours) 

This course is a study of five selected topics from five periods in United States history emphasizing political, social, military, and other aspects of history. The five periods involved are colonial, federal, mid-nineteenth century, late nineteenth century, and mid-twentieth century.  

HIST 2133 WESTERN CIVILIZATION   (3 hours) 

This course is a survey of the background of western civilization, covering the early history of man and the civilization of the ancient Near-East, Greece, and Rome up to the Renaissance and Reformation. 

HIST 2313 WORLD HISTORY  (3 hours) 

This course introduces students to moral, economic, political, social, ideological, and cultural connections and developments in non-Western civilizations from antiquity to modern times.  

HIST 3103 CHURCH HISTORY  (3 hours) 

This course examines the development of the Christian church from the end of the apostolic age to the present.  Consideration is given to the outstanding persons and events of this period and to the doctrinal development which took place. 

HIST 3313 OKLAHOMA HISTORY  (3 hours) 

This course provides a survey of Oklahoma History, including its geography, Native American populations, exploration, Indian reservation system, land openings, political origins and evolution, agricultural and mineral development, and economic progress. Oklahoma’s distinct cultural identity is studied.  

HIST 3413 EUROPEAN HISTORY 1500 TO 1815  (3 hours) 

This course is a study of early European history from the Renaissance to the French Revolution and Napoleon.  

HIST 3423 EUROPEAN HISTORY 1815-PRESENT  (3 hours) 

This course is a study of European history from 1815 to the present and includes the dominant political, social, and cultural trends in the major countries.

HIST 3723 HISTORY OF MISSIONS  (3 hours)

This course is a complement to the study of church history.  Its focus is on the development of missionary activity, people, practices, problems, and progression from the apostolic age to the present day. Cross-listed as MISS 3723.  

HIST 4103 HISTORY OF MATHEMATICS  (3 hours) 

This course is a study of the historical development of mathematics, including an introduction to the works of notable mathematicians and a look at famous problems and their development over time.  Prerequisite: MATH 1513 and junior standing or permission of the instructor.  Cross-listed as MATH 4103.  

HIST 4113 TWENTIETH CENTURY HISTORY  (3 hours) 

This course is a study of the history of the twentieth century with a special focus on the rise of the United States as a world power.  The study will include the general cultural, economic, and political developments that shaped the course of world events. 

HIST 4903 SPECIAL TOPICS  (3 hours) 

Various subjects in the area of study will be presented through research and writing or through visiting professors and lecturers that complement the curriculum and take advantage of the educational background, experience, and expertise of the instructor. Emphasis is given to the creative approaches, research, and/or collaborative learning to enrich the understanding of the student.  Permission of instructor is required.  This course may be repeated with a change of subject matter for a maximum of nine credit hours.  

PHIL 2203 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY  (3 hours) 

This course is a basic introduction to the problems, methods, and terminology of philosophy by means of an historical examination of the major philosophers in the Western tradition.  The perennial questions of philosophy are explored including, the nature of God, reality, knowledge, values, and humanity.  The analysis of these issues emphasizes their integration in the development of an overall conceptual framework or worldview. 

PHIL 3003 LOGIC   (3 hours) 

This course is an examination of logical methods and procedures, with some consideration of contemporary philosophy of logic.  

PHIL 3103 CASE STUDIES IN ETHICS  (3 hours) 

This course includes readings, discussions, and development of papers pertaining to relevant case studies and readings involving ethical issues applied to actual situations.  

PHIL 3203 CHRISTIAN PERSPECTIVE  (3 hours) 

This course will explore ways in which the student can develop a positive relationship with God as he or she explores the role of general revelation (the creation) and special revelation (the Scriptures) in the development of a Christian Worldview.  

PHIL 4213 ADVANCED APOLOGETICS  (3 hours) 

This course is an advanced study of the case for Christianity and a critical evaluation of common objections to Christian truth claims.  Attention will be given to theoretical arguments for/against the truth of the Christian faith.  Emphasis will also be given to the practical application of the ideas discussed for ministry and personal evangelism.  Prerequisite: PHIL 1122 or permission of the instructor.  

PHIL 4413 LIFE & WRITINGS OF C.S. LEWIS   (3 hours) 

This course is a study of the life and writings of the influential Twentieth century Christian writer C.S. Lewis.  Attention will be given to Lewis’ contribution to a variety of fields including: theology, philosophy, apologetics, ethics, literary criticism, fiction, children’s stories, etc. Prerequisites: ENGL 1113 and ENGL 1213, PHIL 2203 or permission of the instructor.  Cross-listed as ENGL 4413.  

PHIL 4443 FIRST PRINCIPLES  (3 hours) 

This course is designed as an integrated study of various topics, scripture texts, literature, and methodologies in Christian ministry.  The purpose is to introduce the student to a comprehensive view of the ontology of personal and corporate ministry.  The discovery of ‘First Principles’ will be derived through synthesis of descriptive accounts of existence, religion, the individual, the minister, and other related subjects.  Cross-listed as THEO 4443.  

PHIL 4903 SPECIAL TOPICS  (3 hours) 

Various subjects in the area of study will be presented through research and writing or through visiting professors and lecturers that complement the curriculum and take advantage of the educational background, experience, and expertise of the instructor. Emphasis is given to the creative approaches, research, and/or collaborative learning to enrich the understanding of the student.  Permission of instructor is required.  This course may be repeated with a change of subject matter for a maximum of nine credit hours.